Digital ParentingMar 30, 2020

How to Stay Connected When You’re Isolating

How to Stay Connected When You’re Isolating

A few weeks ago, most of us had never heard the term “social distancing,” and now, it has changed the way we connect with one another. Following the advice of health care professionals and politicians alike, many of us are now working remotely, canceling family gatherings and staying home as much as possible. And others still are self-isolating, having friends or family drop off essentials for them while they stay inside.

While some of the ways we used to socialize are on hold for now, that doesn’t mean that we need to be disconnected from our family and friends. Below, we share some tips for how you can stay connected while you’re isolating.

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Lean into technology

It wasn’t that long ago that many were questioning whether the internet was isolating us. Fast forward to today, and technology has become a lifeline for people while they’re isolating. Video conferencing platforms that used to be reserved for work are suddenly helping us stay connected to friends and family while messaging apps are allowing us to stay in touch throughout the day. Learning and working are now happening remotely for many of us, which means that tech is more useful—and indeed necessary—than ever.

And beyond the new utility we’re finding in technology, we’re coming to rely on it more than ever for an escape. Streaming services, social media, online libraries and games are providing much-needed entertainment while other activities are on hold—and this is especially true for families with kids who are seeing old screen time rules updated for a new normal.

Join online activities, classes and live-streams

For most of us, our daily activities are now restricted to what we can do inside our homes. That means that soccer practice is on hold and piano lessons are on pause. But, a lot of fitness studios, galleries and restaurants are pivoting to offer online workouts, services and classes. Many personal trainers are adapting their programming so that exercises and activities can be done from home without equipment, and a lot of restaurants are sharing recipes that can be easily made with common ingredients around the house. Joining in for a live-streamed event (or even checking out a pre-recorded one) can help you feel connected while providing a much-needed distraction.

And this goes for kids as well. Online resources like DIY.org had a slew of activities and projects with step-by-step videos to keep kids entertained (and DIY is offering a 90% discount right now with the code TOGETHER).

Embrace the pen pal mentality

Even though a lot of us are staying home right now, our schedules still seem to be just as tough to negotiate. And, now that we’re relying on our household devices to work, learn, connect and relax, it can be tricky to coordinate a time to video chat live with family and friends. A good way to stay connected despite a hectic schedule is to embrace the pen pal mentality. Sharing asynchronous video and audio with Kinzoo can give you that face-to-face connection with loved ones without the extra coordination.

And just in case you’re skeptical about the power of asynchronous video, just take a look at this remote symphony performance—all recorded individually and edited together after the fact!

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Support others in your community

It’s not uncommon to feel a little helpless during a time like this. But, it’s important to remember that you’re not alone, and a great way to remind yourself and your kids of this fact is to help others out if you can. That could mean dropping off groceries for quarantined family, friends or neighbors—or even helping out strangers in your community. Check for Facebook groups in your area that are dedicated to neighbors helping each other out if you’re looking to lend a hand. And, keep an eye out for initiatives in your community—like this one where Vancouver residents open their windows and cheer every night at 7pm to say thanks to health care workers—because even a small shared gesture can help you feel connected to something larger.